The Harmonized Scale

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When you harmonize the scale you have three Major chords, three minor chords and a diminished chord.

The three Major chords are a fifth apart and the corresponding, relative minor chords are also a fifth apart

Harmonized-ScaleF1.jpg

Now insert each relative minor chord below its corresponding Major chord and add the
diminished chord at the top, a third up.

Harmonized-ScaleF2.jpg

The chords are now a third apart.

But the bottom three chords are a 9th, 11th and 13th from the chord at the top.

Intervals greater than an octave are difficult to recognize.

So let us move each of those three chords up one octave.

Harmonized-ScaleF3.jpg

You now have the harmonized Major scale.

Harmonized Scale - Another View

The Circle of fifths for chords.

If you take a diminished chord and start building chords a 5th apart you get all the diatonic
chords for the key a 1/2 step up (7th down) from the diminished chord.
Harmonized-Scale-AVF1.jpg

When you go up you get the two Major chords then the Dominant chord.
At the Dominant chord it changes to the three minor chords if you continue up.
                   
If you go down you get the three minor chords then the Dominant chord.
At the Dominant chord it changes to the two Major chords.

The Circle of thirds for chords

Now let us take the minor chords and insert them next to their relative Majors..

Harmonized-Scale-AVF2.jpg

As you can see the chords are now a third apart, and each minor chord is a third away from
a Major chord.

But the bottom three chords are a 9th, 11th and 13th from the chord at the top.

Intervals greater than an octave are difficult to recognize.

So let us move each of those three chords up one octave.

The Circle of sevenths for chords.

Harmonized-Scale-AVF3.jpg

You now have the harmonized Major scale.
Each chord is now a seventh down (second up) from the other chord.
We will refer to these as adjacent chords.